Alchemy and Herbalism


Alchemy and herbalism are key tools in Athasian life, allowing for the creation of a variety of substances, from healing balms to deadly poisons. Today we’re giving you rules that we use in our streamed Dark Sun 2e game for crafting alchemical and herbal items, several concoctions and poisons for use in your game (including a revised poisons chart for bards and traders), and a master list of ingredients and what substances they are used to create.


Alchemy

The key necessity for an alchemist is the laboratory, a workshop where the character can carry out his activities safely and securely. Setting up and stocking a workshop costs 2,000 cp. The alchemist can then use the laboratory to create and identify alchemical substances.

The alchemist can create acids, incendiaries, and pyrotechnics from readily-available ingredients. If the alchemist has access to the more specialised ingredients listed below, he can also make cave fisher adhesive, gaund egg slime, intoxicants, kip pheromone, painkillers, and stimulants.


Alchemical items are permanent – they do not expire like herbal concoctions.


Create Substances: Creating alchemical compounds takes 1d3 days and (1d4+1) x10 cp per vial, or 1d4+1 days and (1d6+4) x10 cp per flask.


The alchemist must pass an alchemy non-weapon proficiency check in order to successfully manufacture the substance; failing the proficiency check with a natural 20 results in an explosion or other mishap that exposes the character to the effects of his work and damages the laboratory for 10%–60% (1d6 x 10%) of its construction value.


Identify Substances: The alchemist can identify unknown elements or compounds with a successful proficiency check. Identifying samples requires 1d4 days.


Simple materials, such as powdered minerals or ores, provide the alchemist with a +1 to +4 bonus on his check. Rare, complex, or damaged or incomplete samples might impose a –1 to –4 penalty.


Herbalism

Unlike alchemy, herbalism does not require the use of a laboratory – a simple kitchen provides sufficient tools to carry out the herbalist’s art.


A character with this skill can improve their use of the healing proficiency, identify plants and fungi, prepare herbal brews, and prepare poisons. The herbalist can fulfil these functions with common ingredients. If the character does not have such ingredients, it takes a day of searching the local environment to refresh his stocks.


Identify Plants: A successful proficiency check will reveal a plant’s most common names and whether or not it is edible, poisonous, or medicinal. It allows the herbalist to know where a certain plant grows and to find it if any are growing nearby.


Improve Healing: The herbalist can add an extra hit point per day to resting patients receiving benefits of the healing proficiency, treat ingested and contact poisons, and improve treatment of non-magical diseases with healing proficiency, granting a +2 bonus to the check.


Prepare Brews: A successful proficiency check creates one dose of a battlefield balm, healing salve, painkiller, or poison antidote that lasts for 1d3 days. It takes 1 hour to make the dose and costs half the brew’s market price. The herbalist can make these from readily available ingredients. If the herbalist has access to the special ingredients listed below, he can make arena powder, draxia ointment, fordorran musk, healing infusions, intoxicants, ranike sap, strong painkillers, and stimulants


Prepare Poisons: A successful check means the character makes a single dose that lasts for 24 hours. It costs half the poison’s market price and takes 24 hours to make the dose – the herbalist spends 4 hours preparing the poison, following which the mixture must brew for 20 hours before it is ready. There is a 5% chance the character poisons himself accidentally while preparing the poison (unless he is a bard or a trader).

See the Poison section below for further details on the processes involved in making poisons.


Poison

As noted above, poison is crafted using the herbalism non-weapon proficiency. It can also be gathered from certain monsters. Although frowned upon, poison is rarely wholly illegal in the city-states of Athas.


Bards and Traders

These classes are the most skilled users of poison on Athas – the former more so than the latter. Both acquire the ability to craft poison as part of their class and both learn how to craft increasing types of poison as they advance in levels.


At each level, bards and traders roll 1d4, add the result to their level, and consult the poisons table (see below) to determine which new poison they have learned.


If the character has already learned the poison, they gain no new poison but may alter a known poison so all saves against that poison are at –2. If the total is 21 or higher, the character may choose any poison on the list.


Once learned, the character can make a single dose of the poison every day using easily obtained materials at no cost, without needing to make a proficiency check. Each dose of poison lasts for 24 hours before becoming inert.


If the bard or trader has the herbalism non-weapon proficiency (see below), they can use this to craft additional doses of any poison they know using the normal rules for that non-weapon proficiency.


Bards and traders never risk poisoning themselves when handling or crafting poisons.



Crafting Poison with Herbalism

Any character with the herbalism non-weapon proficiency can prepare poisons with common ingredients. If the character does not have such ingredients, it takes a day of searching the local environment to refresh his stocks.


A successful herbalism check means the character makes a single dose of poison that lasts for 24 hours. This costs the amount listed on the table opposite and takes 24 hours to make the dose – the herbalist spends 4 hours preparing the poison, following which the mixture must brew for 20 hours before it is ready. There is a 5% chance the character poisons himself accidentally while preparing the poison (unless he is a bard or a trader).


The herbalist can make type A, K, O, and G poison from easily obtainable ingredients (specifically, cha’thrang lime, redleaf paste, kank venom, and redleaf sap). If he has access to specialised ingredients, he can also create types I, M, C, and P (desert mastyrial extract, gray root, barbed scorpion venom, and siltweed extract).


The knowledge of how to make these poisons is possessed by all characters with basic herbalism skills. The crafting section below includes more detailed descriptions of all the known types of poison that can be crafted by bards, traders, and herbalists. A character with the herbalism non-weapon proficiency may learn these at the DM’s discretion. Otherwise, the DM should feel free to restrict these types to bards and traders only.


Gathering Poison with Animal Lore

The animal lore non-weapon proficiency allows a character to harvest poison from creatures with a successful proficiency check. Failure means that the attempt fails and the body part in question is ruined.

The herbalism and survival non-weapon proficiencies are both sufficient to allow a character to identify and gather poisons from plants and other sources in the wild. The DM may require a non-weapon proficiency check in such cases if desired.


Treating Poison with Healing

A character with the healing non-weapon proficiency can treat injury poison without a proficiency check immediately after poisoning. The healer must tend the patient for 5 rounds. Following this, the patient makes their poison saving throw with a +2 bonus. If care is interrupted, the patient makes their save immediately with no bonus. If the healer also has herbalism, he can treat ingested and contact poisons.


Price Lists

Below are price lists for buying alchemical and herbal items, including an expanded list detailing poisons. Following this is information on the ingredients required to craft these various items.


Alchemical Items

The following items all require the alchemy non-weapon proficiency to create. See below for recommended ingredients and crafting processes. As noted, alchemical items do not expire.

Acid: Acid inflicts 1d3 damage per vial, or 2d4 damage per flask. On the second round, acid from a vial inflicts 1 damage, or 1d3 damage if from a flask. A flask affects all creatures within five feet. Acid can burn out a lock or clasp, forcing an item saving throw.

Cave Fisher Adhesive: The sticky secretions of the cave fisher can be alchemically treated and added to gloves and boots to grant a +10% bonus on the climb walls rogue skill for one hour.

Gaund Egg Slime: The slime of a gaund egg can be smeared onto a flammable object to grant it a permanent +3 bonus on saves vs. fire. A dose of the slime can also neutralise nearly any acid.

Incendiary: Incendiaries ignite when exposed to air. A flask of incendiary liquid inflicts damage as burning oil (2d6 points in the first round, 1d6 in the second). Incendiary powders or liquids can easily start fires if used on buildings, dry brush, or other easily flammable materials.

Intoxicant: The drinker loses 1d4 points from one ability score for one hour (save vs. poison to avoid).

Kip Pheromone: Creatures exposed to this gas must save versus poison or cease caring about anything, including drinking water, for 1d8 turns. They can be herded along or made to drink, but otherwise remain apathetic. Dwarves receive a +4 bonus on their save.

Painkiller: A painkiller restores 1d4 hit points for 2 hours. If the patient fights during this period, he loses an additional 1d4 hit points when the painkiller wears off from aggravating his injuries.

Painkiller, Strong: A strong painkiller restores 1d8 hit points. 1d4 of these fade after 4 hours. If the character fights during this period, he loses a further 1d4 hit points from aggravating his injuries.

Pyrotechnics: Pyrotechnics resemble incendiaries, but create clouds of billowing smoke of a variety of colours, or bright flashes of light when added to an existing fire.

A vial creates a cloud of smoke 5 feet in diameter, obscuring vision. A flask creates a cloud of smoke 10 feet in diameter. The clouds persist for 1d3 rounds, depending on the wind and other conditions.

Stimulant: The patient gains a point of Strength, Dexterity or Constitution for one hour. Thereafter, he loses 1d4 points from the same ability for 6 hours.


Herbal Items

Arena Powder: A dirty trick used in the arena involves the use of irritants and powdered peppers, mixed to induce nausea or inflame eyes and breathing passages. The mix is carefully placed in a small sealed bag or a reed blow pipe. A gladiator will use the spices to blind or distract an opponent. The target saves against poison or suffers the effect of the powder:

  • Kuzza pepper: Inflamed eyes and breathing passages, –2 on all rolls for 1d4 rounds

  • Dried stinkweed: Nauseated and retching, can move or act but not both for 1d3 rounds

  • Siltflower pollen: Fine dust that fills the eyes, blinds the target for one round

Battlefield Balm: This is applied at the same time as receiving battlefield healing. It heals the patient of an extra 1d3 hit points.

Draxia Ointment: A weed that grows on the islands of the Sea of Silt, draxia can be made into an ointment that repels silt spawn and irritates silt horrors. When its juice is rubbed on the skin, it repels silt spawn – for two hours, they won’t come within 10 feet of creature coated with the stuff. While silt horrors don’t like the smell or draxia, they can ignore it and attack as usual in its presence. In fact, many times the irritation caused by the plant’s juice simply serves to infuriate a silt horror. There is a 60% chance that a silt horror will ignore other targets to attack a character who smells of draxia weed.

Fordorran Musk: Fordorran musk glands can be harvested and their fluids rendered into a vapour which delivers a stench comparable to that of the parent creature. Normally delivered through a glass vial, any creature within 10 feet of the vapour must save vs. poison or gag and retch for 1d3 rounds. While so affected, the victim can only move at one third its normal speed but can save each round to throw off the effect.

Healing Infusion: The recipient regains 1d4 hit points. A patient can only benefit from one healing infusion per day.

Healing Salve: The patient gains an extra hit point per day of rest for 1d3 days. If the herbalist also has healing, this increases to 1d4 extra hit points per day. This can only be used when the patient is resting – it has no effect at other times.

Intoxicant: The drinker loses 1d4 points from one ability score for one hour (save vs. poison to avoid).

Painkiller: A painkiller restores 1d4 hit points for 2 hours. If the patient fights during this period, he loses an additional 1d4 hit points when the painkiller wears off from aggravating his injuries.

Painkiller, Strong: A strong painkiller restores 1d8 hit points. 1d4 of these fade after 4 hours. If the character fights during this period, he loses a further 1d4 hit points from aggravating his injuries.

Poison: The herbal items table lists the most commonly available poisons. Other poisons are available, but characters would need contacts among the bard or trader community to acquire such items.

Any character using poison has a 5% chance of poisoning themselves. Bards and traders never run this risk. See the poison table above for details on poison potencies.

Poison Antidote: If administered immediately, the patient gains +2 on their poison saving throw.

Ranike Sap Smoke: The smoke of the sap of the ranike tree is repulsive to insectoids – including thri-kreen. An adult tree yields enough sap to make a ball two inches in diameter; extracting this sap from the tree takes 2d4 hours and a successful herbalism non-weapon proficiency check.

The ball burns for 1d4+2 hours; its smoke permeates an area with a 60-foot radius (barring strong winds). Entering the smoke requires an insectoid to make a Wisdom check. Each round spent in the area, the creature must save vs. poison or suffer a –2 penalty to attack rolls, saves, and Dexterity bonuses to AC. The penalties end one round after leaving the area.

Stimulant: The patient gains a point of Strength, Dexterity or Constitution for one hour. Thereafter, he loses 1d4 points from the same ability for 6 hours.


Crafting Alchemical Items

The information below presents common methods and ingredients for crafting the various alchemical items listed above.


Acid

The most common form of acid is vitriol, made from sulphur, vanadia, and water, through a simple process of burning and hydration. Mix the vitriol with salt, then mix both with water to make muriatic acid. A weaker phosphoric acid can be made by reacting the vitriol with phosphate rock.


Cave Fisher Adhesive

When treated with cinnabar and diluted vitriol, the adhesive of the cave fisher becomes sufficiently pliable to apply to gloves and boots, granting the appropriate bonus to the climb walls rogue skill.


Gaund Egg Slime

The slime of the gaund egg requires only dilution with water in order to prepare it for application to objects.


Incendiary

Igniting on contact with air, incendiaries are made by heating phosphate rock with carbon and silica, collecting the resulting vapour under phosphoric acid (itself made by reacting phosphate rock with vitriol) and storing the resulting compound in a vial or flask until needed.


Kip Pheromone

When stabilised with ammonia fumes, kip pheromone can be stored in vials and bottles for later deployment against suitable targets.


Pyrotechnics

There are two types of pyrotechnics that can be made with common alchemical processes – billowing smoke and flash powder. Mix ammonia (from animal dung) and muriatic acid to create billowing smoke, or mix silica and periclase together with crystals extracted from dried bat guano to make flash powder.


Intoxicant

Alchemical intoxicants can be created by mixing alcohol with vitriol. This requires a special combustion chamber that will burn additional alcohol as a fuel for cold flame at a low temperature. High temperatures will ruin the mixture.


Painkiller

An alchemical painkiller can be manufactured from the natural acids of the thale cress plant, vitriol, and the use of a special combustion chamber that mixes high temperature with high atmospheric pressure.


Stimulant

Mix benzene (from crude oil) with allyl salts and react the resulting compound with ammonia to produce the stimulant. Allyl salts are very hard to make, with their own lengthy production process involving allyl alcohol, phosphate rock, and brine.


Crafting Herbal Brews

The information below presents the most common methods and ingredients for crafting the various herbal items listed above.


Arena Powder

All arena powder requires a stabilising and binding agent. This is usually the juice of the cloud moss tree, which only grows in the higher valleys of the Ringing Mountains and is correspondingly hard to obtain. Beyond that, the powder uses kuzza pepper, dried stinkweed, or siltflower pollen as desired.


Battlefield Balm

Battlefield balm is made from extracts of the kola berry and the oils of the copra nut, forming a paste that can be slathered over injuries.


Draxia Ointment

The leaves of the draxia weed are crushed and mixed with copra nut oil to form the ointment. Draxia weed only grows on islands in the Sea of Silt and so is very hard to come by.


Healing Infusion

Kola berry extracts are mixed with diluted barbed scorpion venom to produce an infusion that can heal minor injuries. Taking more than one infusion per day risks overdose from the venom, which would counteract the healing effect.


Healing Salve

Thale cress and kola berry extracts are mixed with erdlu fat to create a stable salve suitable for long-term application.


Intoxicant

An illicit substance in every city state and very hard to come by, black lotus makes a powerful intoxicant. Usually powdered and added to another substance to delivery, its effects are unmistakeable.


Painkiller

The pulp of the coiled fist cactus is a natural painkiller that can be brewed into a palatable tonic.


Painkiller, Strong

For a stronger painkiller, the pulp of the coiled fist cactus is mixed with the juice of the whitestone berry. As the whitestone plant only grows on volcanic terrain, acquiring it can prove difficult.


Poison Antidote

A mixture of charcoal and crushed mandrake root is infused into water and forms the basis of the standard poison antidote.


Ranike Sap Smoke

The sap of the ranike tree is soaked in brine, fashioned into a ball and dried to produce a gummy globule that can be burned to ward off insectoids.


Stimulant

The leaves of the chama bush, when properly dried and chewed, have a strong stimulating property. These only grow in the Crescent Forest, so obtaining them can prove difficult.


Crafting Poisons

The following information presents the most common methods and ingredients for crafting the poison types listed above. As noted above, any character who is not a bard or a trader runs a 5% chance of poisoning themselves whenever they handle or attempt to craft any type of poison.


Class A

Cha’thrang lime is used in construction to stabilise soil for foundations, roads, etc. and is easy to obtain. A herbalist can boil an infusion with kuzza peppers to create a paste that will adhere to weapons.

Mulworms are common pests that can be found in many trees and cacti. When several are slowly squeezed in a specially prepared press over the course of several hours, the resulting juices can be strained and dried in the sun. If mixed with simple lamp oil, this produces a modest poison that can be smeared on an object to be absorbed through the skin of anyone touching it.

When ingested or delivered through an injury, mulworm slime is far more potent and is treated as a Class J poison – see below for more details.


Class B

Megapede venom, assuming you can acquire some, can be mixed with faro flour to create a paste that can be placed on a weapon or other delivery system.

Widow’s bile is made from the widow’s kiss cactus – a common cactus that is not safe to eat. Skilled herbalists know that it can be stewed with the juice of the blueflower cactus over several hours to properly activate the poison.


Class C

Barbed scorpion venom is used by many healers in weakened solution form as a disinfectant. This is a specialised ingredient that is not commonly for sale – the character needs access to a healer or a well-stocked apothecary in order to obtain it. If the character acquires some and boils and reduces it in a solution several times over several hours in the right quantities, they can extract a useable dose of the venom.


Class D

Antloid venom is gathered by most elven tribes from abandoned antloid hives on their travels through the deserts and sold at their markets. A lengthy distillation process will produce a dose of the venom that can be applied to a weapon.

Gold scorpions are not hard to locate on the outskirts of cities. Their venom can actually be extracted from their eggs, avoiding encounters with an adult. Crushing several of these eggs together in the juice of a welela gourd will create a solution that bears the venom.


Class E

Crystal spider venom is very hard to obtain in its natural state but can be rendered into a usable dose that can be applied to a weapon by distillation.

Dark spider queen venom can actually be obtained from the dark spiders, who trade it with the creatures of the surface world for slaves and other goods. Several large trading houses will sell the raw venom to those they trust. If mixed with alcohol and boiled, it produces a dose that can be used on a weapon.

Silt serpent venom is used as an ingredient in several tanning and leather curing processes. If a character buys large quantities of the tanning agent and mixes it with alcohol and crushed salt and leave it in the sun, they will then be able to extract the venom in enough quantities to make a worthwhile dose.


Class F

A less potent version than the venom of their queen, dark spider venom is similarly traded with the creatures of the surface world. As with dark spider queen venom, certain trading houses will sell the raw venom to those they trust. Deriving a useful dose requires the same process as the queen’s venom – it should be mixed with alcohol and boiled to produce a dose that can be used on a weapon.


Class G

The redleaf cactus is known to be poisonous – when eaten, its sap induces nausea and vomiting but nothing worse. This active ingredient can be extracted by carefully boiling the leaves in kola tea, which produces a fine and toxic powder when dried.


Class H

The musk of the kivit can actually be “milked” from the animal in minute amounts. Over time, enough of this musk can be gathered and slowly stewed in water in order to produce a dose of the poison.


Class I

Similar to barbed scorpion venom, the venom of the desert mastyrial is used by healers as a disinfectant and antiseptic – and it is similarly difficult to obtain without the right connections. When distilled in enough quantities and mixed with fermented kank honey, it produces a dose of a potent poison.


Class J

Methelinoc is a purple herb found only in the Ringing Mountains but, if obtained, its berries can be crushed to produce a juice that is mixed with water and left to infuse. The leaves and stems of the plant are discarded. The result is a lethal toxin. For some reason, it does not affect elves or kanks.

As noted above, mulworm slime is far more potent when ingested or delivered via an injury. It is obtained by the usual method – slowly squeezing several of the grubs in a specially prepared press and straining and drying the resulting juices in the sun. This produces a powerful toxin that can be added to other ingredients without taste or odour or applied to a weapon as needed.


Class K

While the sap of the redleaf cactus can be used to make a strong ingested poison, herbalists also know how to make it into a paste that can poison someone through their skin. The active ingredient can be extracted by carefully boiling the leaves in kola tea and then crushing the resulting fine powder into the oil of the copra nut. This oil can be smeared on an object – anyone touching it will adsorb the poison through their skin.


Class L

Bittershine powder is created by combining small amounts of weak acid with the sap of three different common cacti (whitebud, star cactus, and jhakar’s paw). The resulting greasy solution can be smeared on a surface or object.


Class M

Gray root is a weed that grows in the dung of carru, sygra, and other domestic herd animals. Its sticky sap can be extracted by crushing the leaves. Mixing it with brine and ground phosphate rock, produces a thin slime that can be applied to objects as a contact poison.


Class N

Black lotus is famous as a powerful intoxicant, chewed for its psychogenic properties. When brewed in large amounts, however, and distilled with siltweed juice, it becomes an incredibly potent slime that can be applied as a lethal contact poison.


Class O

Kank venom, while not hard to obtain, needs various stabilising ingredient to retain its potency outside of a kank’s mandibles. When combined with these – berill moss and rock cactus juice – it can be rendered into a paralytic poison suitable for applying to weapons.

Harder to obtain is the venom of the mountain spider. This is more stable but evaporates almost immediately on exposure to the air and so must be rendered into a solution over several hours in order to be useful.


Class P

Siltweed extract is procured relatively easily through a crushing and boiling process over a few hours. When combined with cinnabar, the resulting toxin can be delivered through a wound and, will eventually debilitate its victim with cramps, fever, and overwhelming tremors.


Class Q

Bloodgrass is a blood-drinking plant seen as a weed by many but cultivated as a watchdog by others. Its sap can be extracted and rendered into a sticky paste by mixing it with kank honey or a similar substance. The resulting substance is ideal for applying to weapons.


Ingredient Master List

This list summarises the various crafting ingredients listed above for ease of reference.

Acid: Primary ingredient in Class L poison (bittershine powder). Secondary ingredient in pyrotechnics. Secondary ingredient in cave fisher adhesive.

Alcohol: Secondary ingredient in Class E poison (dark spider queen venom, silt serpent venom), Class F poison (dark spider venom).

Allyl Salts: Secondary ingredient in alchemical stimulant.

Ammonia: Primary ingredient in pyrotechnics. Secondary ingredient in alchemical stimulant. Secondary ingredient in kip pheromone.

Antloid Venom: Primary ingredient in Class D poison (antloid venom).

Benzene: Primary ingredient in alchemical stimulant.

Berill Moss: Secondary ingredient in Class O poison (kank venom).

Black Lotus: Primary ingredient in Class N poison (black lotus). Primary ingredient in herbal intoxicant.

Bloodgrass: Primary ingredient in Class Q poison (bloodgrass sap.

Brine: Secondary ingredient in Class M poison (gray root). Secondary ingredient in ranike sap smoke.

Cactus, Blueflower: Secondary ingredient in Class B poison (widow’s bile)

Cactus, Coiled Fist: Primary ingredient in painkiller. Primary ingredient in strong painkiller.

Cactus, Jhakar’s Paw: Secondary ingredient in Class L poison (bittershine powder).

Cactus, Redleaf: Primary ingredient in Class G poison (redleaf sap). Primary ingredient in Class K poison (redleaf paste).

Cactus, Rock: Secondary ingredient in Class O poison (kank venom).

Cactus, Star: Secondary ingredient in Class L poison (bittershine powder).

Cactus, Whiteflower: Secondary ingredient in Class L poison (bittershine powder).

Cactus, Widow’s Kiss: Primary ingredient in Class B poison (widow’s bile).

Carbon: Secondary ingredient in incendiaries. Primary ingredient in poison antidote (in the form of charcoal).

Cave Fisher Adhesive: Primary ingredient in cave fisher adhesive.

Chama Bush: Primary ingredient in stimulant.

Cha’thrang Lime: Primary ingredient in Class A poison.

Cinnabar: Secondary ingredient in Class P poison (siltweed extract). Secondary ingredient in cave fisher adhesive.

Cloud Moss Tree: Secondary ingredient in arena powder.

Copra Nut: Secondary ingredient in Class K poison (redleaf paste). Secondary ingredient in battlefield balm. Secondary ingredient in draxia ointment.

Draxia Weed: Primary ingredient in draxia ointment.

Erdlu Fat: Secondary ingredient in healing salve.

Gaund Egg: Primary ingredient in gaund egg slime.

Gray Root: Primary ingredient in Class M poison (gray root).

Guano: Secondary ingredient in pyrotechnic flashpowder.

Kank Honey: Secondary ingredient in Class Q poison (bloodgrass sap).

Kank Honey, Fermented: Secondary ingredient in Class I poison (desert mastyrial extract)

Kank Venom: Primary ingredient in Class O poison (kank venom).

Kip Pheromone: Primary ingredient in kip pheromone.

Kivit Musk: Primary ingredient in Class H poison (kivit musk)

Kola Berry: Primary ingredient in battlefield balm. Primary ingredient in healing infusion. Secondary ingredient in healing salve.

Kola Tea: Secondary ingredient in Class G poison (redleaf sap). Secondary ingredient in Class K poison (redleaf paste).

Kuzza Peppers: Primary ingredient in arena powder. Secondary ingredient in Class A poison (cha’thrang lime).

Flour, Faro: Secondary ingredient in Class B poison (megapede venom)

Magnesium: Secondary ingredient in pyrotechnic flashpowder.

Mandrake Root: Primary ingredient in poison antidote.

Megapede venom: Primary ingredient in Class B poison (megapede venom)

Methelinoc: Primary ingredient in Class J poison (methelinoc).

Mulworm Juice: Primary ingredient in Class A and J poison (mulworm slime)

Oil, Lamp: Secondary ingredient in Class A poison (mulworm slime)

Periclase: Secondary ingredient in pyrotechnic flashpowder.

Phosphate: Secondary ingredient in Class M poison (gray root). Primary ingredient in phosphoric acid. Primary ingredient in incendiaries.

Ranike Sap: Primary ingredient in ranike sap smoke.

Salt: Secondary ingredient in Class E poison (silt serpent venom). Secondary ingredient in muriatic acids.

Scorpion Venom, Barbed: Primary ingredient in Class C poison (barbed scorpion venom). Secondary ingredient in disinfectant. Secondary ingredient in healing infusion.

Scorpion Venom, Desert Mastyrial: Primary ingredient in Class I poison (desert mastyrial extract). Secondary ingredient in disinfectant.

Scorpion Venom, Gold: Primary ingredient in Class D poison (gold scorpion venom)

Serpent Venom, Silt: Primary ingredient in Class E poison (silt serpent venom).

Silica; Secondary ingredient in incendiaries. Secondary ingredient in pyrotechnic flashpowder.

Siltflower Pollen: Primary ingredient in arena powder.

Siltweed Juice: Primary ingredient in Class P poison (siltweed extract). Secondary ingredient in Class N poison (black lotus).

Spider Venom, Crystal: Primary ingredient in Class E poison (crystal spider venom)

Spider Venom, Dark: Primary ingredient in Class F poison (dark spider venom)

Spider Venom, Dark Queen: Primary ingredient in Class E poison (dark spider queen venom)

Spider Venom, Mountain: Primary ingredient in Class O poison (mountain spider venom)

Stinkweed: Primary ingredient in arena powder.

Sulphur: Primary ingredient in acid.

Thale Cress: Primary ingredient in alchemical painkiller. Primary ingredient in healing salve.

Vanadia: Secondary ingredient in acid.

Water: Secondary ingredient in Class H poison (kivit musk). Secondary ingredient in Class J poison (methelinoc). Secondary ingredient in acid. Secondary ingredient in gaund egg slime.

Welela Gourd: Secondary ingredient in Class D poison (gold scorpion venom).

Whitestone Berry: Secondary ingredient in strong painkiller.


Below you'll find a pdf with all the above information gathered together in one place. If you use these rules in your game, let us know how it goes. And if you have your own rules for crafting alchemical and herbal items, or price lists with extra goodies, please share! We're always on the lookout for new alchemical and herbal toys...

Alchemy and Herbalism
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